my first full length production is over

I’m sorry I’ve been so out of touch, dear readers!

The run of Feedback by Squeaky Bicycle Productions at the Drilling Company in NYC just ended. Some of you may know, but for those who don’t, it was my play about a woman who decides to get re-branded by a personal marketing company. It was also my first full length production. I feel so lucky to have had this piece produced, particularly because it is such a timely play, and I didn’t want it to fall into some sort of development limbo.

I started writing this play less than a year ago! I cannot believe that. To read that fact is a motivator to me. Especially now, when I’m feeling burnt out and not in the intensive writing mindset. But to know that in a year, I may have a solid first draft of a new piece is especially exciting and encouraging.

A very haphazard quasi-list of some things I learned/questions from this production:

You learn so much seeing your play produced night after night. Somehow the flaws become glaringly obvious. And, you start to use lines from the play in your daily life. That’s a bit creepy.

Do playwrights generally attend all of the shows during the run? Since there were only five dates, I decided to attend all of them. Two of the actors remarked upon that, so I started to assume it wasn’t common. Am I overly zealous for coming every night?

There’s a lot of anxiety that comes along with greeting people, thanking them for coming, and trying to not let them down during a show. (Or maybe I am just an overly neurotic person). I have this thing about not wanting to waste people’s time. And I never want to make people sit through crap. Not that Feedback is crap or anything in that realm, but, I hope that everyone who came got something out of the show. Maybe keeping the audience in mind makes me a better playwright? I’m not sure.

Always sit in the back on opening night. You can gauge people’s reactions AND hide.

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